Ever since the 1987 Lovaas study, a lot of attention has been paid to the way in which behavioral treatment occurs in a 1:1 setting. Ongoing research is helping us recognize which procedures or guidelines are helpful when teaching a particular skill or teaching a child with particular characteristics. However, all of this attention on behavioral treatment in a 1:1 setting has made it easy to forget that Dr. Lovaas’ behavioral treatment program was not simply 1:1 treatment. That’s one of the reasons I reject labeling Dr. Lovaas’ work as synonymous with Discrete Trial Teaching. In both the 1987 study and replication studies of 2005 and 2006, the treatment progressed to include play dates with peers and time in school. These interactions were carefully planned, were initially facilitated by a trained aide, and included systematic progression that required just as much time and effort as the 1:1 treatment. It is unfortunate when a behavioral treatment program places all of its emphasis on the 1:1 treatment component while ignoring the importance of these other critical elements of treatment.

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Discrete Trial Teaching: What is it? Why use it? Skill Acquisition Steps?
Teaching Strategies:
*Errorless-not error correction?
*No No Prompting?
*No Prompt?

Could you answer these questions? Thank you

Please browse through our other blogs about discrete trial teaching, prompting, and errorless learning. A discrete trial is a potentially five-part unit of instruction consisting of:

1. the discriminative stimulus (i.e., what the instructor says or does)
2. a prompt (i.e., any help the instructor gives to the child)
3. a response (i.e., what the child does)
4. a consequence (i.e., whether or not the response is reinforced)
5. an inter-trial pause (i.e., the few seconds before the next discriminative stimulus is presented).

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Enclosing asterisks marks text as bold (*word*), underscore are made via _word_.
Standard emoticons like :-) and ;-) are converted to images.
E-Mail addresses will not be displayed and will only be used for E-Mail notifications